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GLOBALISATION, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND THE ROLE OF THE STATE
By Ha-Joon Chang
Publisher: Third World Network and Zed Books
Year Published: 2003
No of pages: 336
Price: US $15 for FIRST WORLD countries; US $10 for THIRD WORLD countries
Postage: Please add 30% to price of book for postage by air mail

The role of the state in the economy has always been a controversial issue in public debate, but it has become more so in the last quarter of a century with the rise of neoliberal thinking that preaches the virtues of unregulated markets and recommends de-regulation, opening-up, and privatisation.  This push for a minimal, pro-business state, especially in developing countries, has been further intensified with both the rise of globalisation and the many radical neoliberal “reforms” implemented, often under pressure from multilateral agencies (such as the IMF, the World Bank, and the WTO). 

In this book, the author highlights the failure of neoliberalism, especially in developing  countries, or what he terms “the intellectual bankruptcy of neoliberalism”, which, he believes, “stems ultimately from its failure to base its discourse on a balanced and sophisticated theory of the inter-relationship between the market, the state, and other institutions”.  He also tries to construct a credible alternative theoretical framework to neoliberalism, informed by a balanced understanding of empirical evidence.  The issues covered concern a rather wide range of domestic and international policy issues - including trade policy, privatisation, transnational corporations, and ntellectual property rights - with some important common theoretical threads running through them, which he calls “the institutionalist polical economy approach”.  It is the author’s hope that this book will help “those who are trying to construct, either at the theoretical level or at the practical level, some credible alternatives to neoliberalism – even if their alternatives are significantly different from mine”.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: HA-JOON CHANG is the Assistant Director of Development Studies at the Faculty of Economics and Politics, University of Cambridge.  His main research interests include theories of state intervention: institutional economics; industrial, trade, and technology policies; globalisation; the East Asian economies; and economic development in historial perspective.  He has been a consultant to many UN organisations such as UNCTAD, UNDP, UNIDO, and WIDER, as well as to international financial institutions such as the World Bank and Asian Development Bank.  He is the author of The Political Economy of Industrial Policy (1994), and more recently, Kicking Away the Ladder - Development Strategy in Historical Perspective (2002).  He has also edited several books and published numerous articles in academic journals and the mass media.

CONTENTS:

INTRODUCTION

PART I. THEORETICAL BACKGROUNDS

CHAPTER 1

THEORIES OF STATE INTERVENTION IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

1.   The Golden Age and the Rise of the State
2.   The Fall of the Golden Age and the Neoliberal Upsurge
3.   Critical Evaluation of the Neoliberal Theories
4.   Conclusion

CHAPTER 2

STATE, INSTITUTIONS AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE

1.      Introduction
2.   Welfare Economics, Neoliberalism and Institutionalism
3.   The State as an Entrepreneur
4.   The State as the Manager of Conflicts
5.      Understanding the Role of the State in Different Types of Capitalism: ‘Industrial Policy’ States Versus Social Corporatism
6.   Conclusion

CHAPTER 3

AN INSTITUTIONALIST PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF THE STATE: TOWARDS AN INSTITUTIONALIST POLITICAL ECONOMY

1.      Introduction
2.      Disentangling the Neoliberal Agenda
3.   Some Institutionalist Criticisms of the Foundations of the Neoliberal Analysis of Market, State, and Politics
4.      Conclusions: Towards an Institutionalist Political Economy

PART II. DOMESTIC POLICY ISSUES

CHAPTER 4

THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF INDUSTRIAL POLICY

1.      Introduction
2.   The logic of Industrial Policy (I): The Static Dimension
3.   The Logic of Industrial Policy (II): The Dynamic Dimension
4.   Possible Problems of Industrial Policy
5.   Conclusion

CHAPTER 5

THE ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF REGULATION

1.      Introduction
2.   Historical Evolution
3.   Going Beyond: Some Neglected Themes
4.   Conclusion

CHAPTER 6

PUBLIC ENTERPRISES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY: A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF ANALYTICAL, EMPIRICAL, AND POLICY ISSUES

1.      Introduction
2.   The ‘Inefficiency’ of Public Enterprises: Preliminary Considerations
3.   The ‘Efficiency” of Public Enterprises: Theoretical Perspectives
4.   Assessment of Empirical Evidence on Relative Efficiency of Public Enterprises: Conceptual Issues
5.   Empirical Evidence on Public Enterprise Performance in the LDGs
6.   How can Public Enterprise Performance be Improved?
7.   Concluding Remarks

PART III. POLICY ISSUES IN THE NEW GLOBAL CONTEXT

CHAPTER 7

GLOBALISATION, TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS, AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: CAN THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES PURSUE STRATEGIC INDUSTRIAL POLICY IN A GLOBALISING WORLD ECONOMY?

1.      Introduction
2.      Globalisation and the Rise of TNCs: Myths, Facts and Neglected Details
3.   TNCs and Economic Development
4.   Does the Rise of Transnational Corporations Make Strategic Industrial Policy by Developing Countries Impossible?
5.   Policy Options for Developing Countries
6.   Conclusion

CHAPTER 8

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: HISTORICAL LESSONS AND EMERGING ISSUES

1.      Introduction
2.   Technology Transfer, IPRs, and Economic Development in a Historical Perspective
3.   Intellectual Property Rights and Economic Development
4.   TRIPS and the Developing Countries
5.   Conclusion

CHAPTER 9

INSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF SELECTIVE TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL POLICIES IN THE LEAST DEVELOPED COUNTRIES: THEORY AND EVIDENCE

1.      Introduction: The Lineage of the Debate
2.   Markets, Policies, and Institutions: Some Theoretical Clarifications
3.   Institutions for Selective Industrial and Trade Policies: Learning from Past Experiences
4.   Changing International Conditions for the Use of SIT Policies
5.   Summary and Conclusion

 


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